Tag Archives: DIY

Earth Day 2017

What a day it was in 1970 when twenty-million of us took to the streets. Wisconsin’s U.S. Senator and Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson had had enough after seeing first-hand the devastating effects of the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California. He was determined to do something about it. And he saw an opportunity, having witnessed the power of the civil rights and anti-war protests that had been raging, and slowly winning, for years. If he could co-opt the movement and turn its strength and resources towards saving our environment, then that was what he was going to do. And like that, the modern environmental movement was born.

We’ve come a long way. We remember the 1960s, when falling into almost any river or lake near a populated area could land you in the hospital. Every city in the country had its own special concoction of prophylactics if you fell in. Boston had the dreaded “Charles River Shot” that came at you in the form of a six-inch long needle. Spending a day in L.A. used to cause wheezing, sore throats, and red, burning eyes. You couldn’t even see the downtown from the hills surrounding the city, there was so much smog in the air. Sulfur-laced clouds filled the skies and acid rain poured down on us all, corroding everything it touched.

No more. As a result of all the hard work and persistence, people can fall in the Charles River today and not worry. California’s initiatives to force car companies to install pollution controls in their cars and remove lead from gasoline have gone a long way towards cleaning up our environment. And despite the relentless resistance from industry and short-sighted politicians that continues to this day, we can breathe again (almost).

There’s no turning back now. And you can help. The fiftieth anniversary Earth Day plans are already underway for 2020. Learn how you fit into the big picture here. And please take a moment on Saturday to tell your children the story of how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go.

 

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3 things to know about Peel & Stick Murals

They’re really, really, really easy to put up.

We want everyone to have maps in their homes. But before you take the traditional route with the shoe box in the closet full of folded maps, allow us to recommend something a bit more glamorous and fully-guaranteed to start up an interesting conversation every time. A map mural.

But hold on. Do you do home repairs, carpentry, sheet rock, or plaster work? No? How about wall paper installs? Not that either? Then we don’t blame you for feeling more than a bit apprehensive about buying one of our giant murals and tackling it yourself. We were convinced that we couldn’t do it. Until we did.

First, let’s get the technical details out of the way. What are map murals?

We are printers. We print paper maps that can be laminated, mounted on spring rollers, framed, or prepared for mural installations. We have five printers that are each the size of a couch. They use pigment inks which are designed specifically for fade-resistance and long life.

We can print on special papers that are more like woven fabric than traditional paper. This kind of paper has a backing that easily peels off, revealing a tacky adhesive that does not stick permanently and allows the map to be re-positioned many times without leaving any marks, folds, or tearing.

Once you find an empty, non-textured wall that you think would be a great place for a map mural, choosing the right map from our online collection and taking some measurements is all you need to do. We’ll take your measurements and divide the map into panels that we print separately. We then package them up and ship them off to you with simple directions. A level, a pencil, and a little time is all you need.

And take it from us. You can do it.

Here is a video we made recently to show you how.

And a link to our mural page on our website.

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