Sangwonsa Temple and the 2018 Winter Olympics

Alpensia Resort and surrounding hills

Alpensia Resort and surrounding hills (photo from Trazy)

Deep inside the Odaesan National Park, above head of one of the many creeks and waterways that flows into the Han River in Seoul, lies the Sangwonsa Temple. Just about 2 hours from Alpensia Resort, one of the main locations of the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, a great mystery has formed over the past 1,300 years. Continue reading

Christmas Gift Ideas 2017 – Illuminated Globes

Summer’s over already?! It’s already time to start looking forward toward the holidays. Yes, Christmas is just around the corner, but we’ve got you covered with globes and maps that fit all styles and budgets for the geographer or traveler in your life. What better way to say “you mean the world to me” than a beautiful (perhaps even illuminated) tabletop globe?

The Bowers
12″ Illuminated Desk Globe from National Geographic
$138.95 – Buy it here
Bowers 12" Globe

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Christmas Gift Ideas 2017 – Globes for Kids

Finding the right globe for a child isn’t easy. You want something they will learn from, of course, but you also want a globe that entertains them to help keep their interest, and built well enough to withstand drops and rough play. We’ve tested several globes over the years with this in mind, and here are our picks for the best globes for kids in 2017:

The Intelliglobe II
12″ Interactive Globe from Replogle Globes
$165.00 – Buy it here

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Christmas Gift Ideas 2017 – Floor Globes

A floor globe is more than just a gift – it’s giving a tradition. It’s a centerpiece. It’s an heirloom. It’s sharing a mutual love for our world, and putting it on display in our homes and offices. We always want ourselves be in the company of the dignified and the distinguished, but now we ourselves can be the dignified and distinguished. Here are our favorite floor globes to establish these connections in 2017:

The Eaton III
16″ Floor Globe from Replogle Globes
$422.00 – Buy it here

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The President’s Globe

In late 1942, General Dwight Eisenhower requested the U.S. Army have identical world globes constructed for President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill. U.S. Army Chief of Staff General George C. Marshall was tasked with commissioning the massive project, and the result was the largest and most accurate globe believed to ever have existed.

The battles now in progress make a most important introduction to the New Year because I am confident that they foreshadow great victories. That you may be better able to follow the course of these battles we wish to install a special globe in your office, the duplicate of which is being delivered to 10 Downing Street.
– General Marshall, in a letter to President Roosevelt
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DIY – Turn that old globe into a hanging lamp

Sometimes you need look no further for inspiration and materials for a rainy day project than your own home. Plus the internet. And let’s be honest about it. The best thing about the internet isn’t social media or shopping. It’s the do-it-yourself videos. (O.K., maybe the cat videos too.)

We spend a lot of time thinking about what you can do with globes and maps. So, we had a do-it-yourself idea. Maybe you have an old globe with a dent or a scratch that you didn’t want to throw away. It ended up in the basement or the attic to live out its days in peace and quiet. Sorry. Nap’s over. We’re going to help you breathe new life into that old globe by turning it into a hanging lamp. Here’s what we’re going to do:
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Winners Announced – “Re-Imagine the Map of the World” Competition

We are very happy to announce, in association with the Center on Contemporary Art, the three winners of our World Map Design Competition. The challenge was to “Re-Imagine the Map of the World”.

1st place
Stephen Rock
Seattle, Washington
“World Map”
$500.00 prize
A full-size giclée print on archival paper
An invitation to sell their winning piece in 1-World’s online store

2nd place
Larry and Debby Kline
Escondido, California
“The Alchemist Afloat in the Gyre”
$250.00 prize
A full-size giclée print on archival paper

3rd place
Brita Ness
Seattle, Washington
“Subdivision”
$100.00 prize
A full-size giclée print on archival paper

We also would like to thank the many other artists who submitted inspiring pieces for the competition. With their permission, we will be exhibiting some of their works on our website in June. Stay tuned.

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NASA called

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration was created by Congress in 1958, purportedly to explore space and study aeronautics. Although part of its declared mission was to ensure that the space program would be conducted for peaceful purposes only, we now know that much of what NASA does is expressly military in nature. There have been many more manned and unmanned space missions than the ones the public has been told about. We can only guess at what they were designed to accomplish and whether they succeeded or failed.

But there is one mission that we know exactly what it was meant to do. The Kepler Space Observatory, named after German mathematician and astronomer Johannes Kepler,  was launched on March 7, 2009 to look for Earth-size planets orbiting other stars.

And they’ve found lots of them. Over one thousand already.

Back here on Earth, we try to ignore all the telemarketers and spammers calling our shop during the day, but when NASA’s Ames Research Center calls, we answer the phone. They’ve called before, as have the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the White Sands Missile Range, and the U.S. Air Force on several occasions. They’re always looking for new maps and globes and we’ve got what they need at worldmapsonline.com and 1worldglobes.com.

This time, NASA needed us to create giant, custom inflatable globes of some of Kepler’s latest discoveries. They sent us the digital artwork they had created and we had it fashioned into a new family of globes – all thanks to the Kepler Observatory that’s still flying today in an Earth-trailing heliocentric orbit through space.

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Earth Day 2017

What a day it was in 1970 when twenty-million of us took to the streets. Wisconsin’s U.S. Senator and Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson had had enough after seeing first-hand the devastating effects of the 1969 oil spill in Santa Barbara, California. He was determined to do something about it. And he saw an opportunity, having witnessed the power of the civil rights and anti-war protests that had been raging, and slowly winning, for years. If he could co-opt the movement and turn its strength and resources towards saving our environment, then that was what he was going to do. And like that, the modern environmental movement was born.

We’ve come a long way. We remember the 1960s, when falling into almost any river or lake near a populated area could land you in the hospital. Every city in the country had its own special concoction of prophylactics if you fell in. Boston had the dreaded “Charles River Shot” that came at you in the form of a six-inch long needle. Spending a day in L.A. used to cause wheezing, sore throats, and red, burning eyes. You couldn’t even see the downtown from the hills surrounding the city, there was so much smog in the air. Sulfur-laced clouds filled the skies and acid rain poured down on us all, corroding everything it touched.

No more. As a result of all the hard work and persistence, people can fall in the Charles River today and not worry. California’s initiatives to force car companies to install pollution controls in their cars and remove lead from gasoline have gone a long way towards cleaning up our environment. And despite the relentless resistance from industry and short-sighted politicians that continues to this day, we can breathe again (almost).

There’s no turning back now. And you can help. The fiftieth anniversary Earth Day plans are already underway for 2020. Learn how you fit into the big picture here. And please take a moment on Saturday to tell your children the story of how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go.

 

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