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Historic Railroad Map of New Jersey - 1887

Code:
1W-NJ-RR-1887
Shipping Weight:
2.00 pounds
Starting at $29.95

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Description

Map of the Railroads of New Jersey 1887.

In 1787 New Jersey became the 3rd organized state.

Trenton, New Jersey is located on the Delaware River with Morristown, Pennsylvania lying just across the river to the west. It was the location of George Washington's first victory in the Battle of Trenton. On December 26, 1776, Washington with his troops crossed the frigid waters of the Delaware and defeated the Hessian troops that held Trenton. Trenton was briefly named the nation's capital after the Revolutionary War.

Newark was originally founded along the Passaic River in 1666 by Puritans from the New Haven Colony.

The completion of the Morris Canal in 1831 enabled Newark to prosper greatly through the transportation of goods. The farming and light industrial communities of New Jersey adapted well to the new means of transportation.

The innovative canal ran from Phillipsburg to Newark, enabling the transportation of anthracite coal and other raw materials from the Lehigh Valley to New Jersey's growing industrial needs.

The canal system involved several inclining ponds to ease the drop of elevation allowing boats to ascend smoothly. Newark was the canal's terminus on the Passaic River. From here materials could be easily be forwarded across Kearny Point and through Jersey City to the Hudson River. Portions of this New Jersey canal system were later dismantled to allow for the coming railroads.

Railroads followed in the path of the canal and by 1874 the City of Newark was a major hub for trade in and out of town.

The first boardwalk in Atlantic City was built in 1870. Fancy hotels of impressive size, as well as smaller rooming houses, were built throughout town including the United States Hotel, which took up an entire city block between Atlantic, Pacific, Maryland and Delaware Avenues. The hotel boasted a luxurious atmosphere with up-to-date amenities. The newly added Philadelphia-Atlantic City Railroad along with the Reading Railroad and the Camden-Atlantic City Railway helped transport almost 500,000 visitors per year to Atlantic City in the 1880's.

This township and county map was published in 1887 by John T. Van Cleef and J. Brognard Betts. It displays drainage, cities and towns, and clearly labeled railroad network of 1887.

The map contains a table of 1887 railroad systems and their mileage. Included are the following systems:

Pennsylvania Railroad System.
Central Railroad of New Jersey System.
New York, Lake Erie & Western Railroad System.
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad System.
Philadelphia & Reading Railroad System.
New York, Susquehanna & Western Railroad System.
West Shore Railroad System (NYC & HR Railroad Lessee).
Lehigh Valley Railroad System.
Other unclassified railroads.

Materials

Archive Paper

Archive Paper

Premium fine art paper that provides accurate color reproduction with high-contrast, high-resolution print output and maximum image permanence. A high-quality print ready for framing.

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  • Heavy-weight 230 gsm, 9.5 mil thickness.
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  • Pigment based Canon LUCIA inks provide smooth tones and rich colors in fine, precise detail.
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