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Historic Map - Morrisville, Vermont - 1889

Code:
1W-VT-MO-1889
Shipping Weight:
2.00 pounds
Starting at $29.95

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Panoramic map of Morrisville, VT, Lamoille County, drawn and published by Geo. E. Norris in 1889.

This brief description of Lamoille County appeared in the 1883-84 Gazetteer of Lamoille and Orleans Counties, VT:

 "Lamoille County, next to Grand Isle the smallest in the State, lies north of the central part of the same, between latitude 44° 24', and 44° 46', and longitude 4° 7', 4° 34', bounded north by Franklin and Orleans counties, east by portions of Orange, Caledonia, and Washington counties, south by Washington county, and west by Franklin and Chittenden counties.  Its extent from north to south is about 27 miles, and nearly the same from east to west, thus giving it an area of about 420 square miles, or 268,800 acres, which contains a population of 12,684.
  In surface it is varied by all the charms of nature, from towering cloud-capped mountains to the sylvan dales and silvery lakeletes that adorn its nestling valleys.  Turn which way you will, the lover of the beautiful in nature cannot fail to meet with that which will both charm and captive the senses.  Upon the north and west rise Mansfield, Sterling, and White0face mountains in their splendor.  Upon the south and east are Hog-back and Elmore mountains, while between them extend broad intervals of excellent farming land.
  Mount Mansfield, consisting of three distinct peaks, lies in the southern part of Cambridge, extending also into the towns of Underhill and Stowe.  Its summit, 4,389 feet above tide water, is the highest point of land in the State.  The name Mansfield is derived from the contour resemblance of the mountain to the face of a human being, the three peaks being designated as the Chin, the Nose, and the Lips.  The Chin furnishes on of the grandest and most extensive views in New England.  Standing upon its summit in a clear day, the observer looks down upon the country extending from the base of the mountain to Lake Champlain as he would upon a map, and beholds in the outspread panorama an agreeable diversity of hills and villages, forests and cultivated fields, villages and streams of water.  Further along in the picture may be seen Lake Champlain, which at intervals is observed, far to the north and south, peering out in the blue distance like inlaid masses of highly polished silver, to give light and beauty to the scene.  The valley of the lake may be traced its entire length, beyond which arise the majestic and picturesque Adirondacks, which give a romantic beauty to the background of the picture, and terminate the vision in that direction by their numerous pointed summits.  Turning to the east, the wavy line of the horizon is broken by the sharp outlines of the White Mountains, which rise up in the dim distance sixty miles off, and form a marked feature in the landscape, while the intervening space is filled with innumerable summits of hills and mountains, with deep extended valleys, showing the location and courses of the Connecticut, Winooski and Lamoille, and their numerous tributaries.  To the north can be seen the wide-spread valley of the St. Lawrence, and by the aid of a glass in a clear day steamers may be seen gliding upon its waters.  The well-known figure of Montreal mountain, from which Cartier first looked upon the mountains of Vermont, rises in the hazy distance.
  Sterling Mountain is about four miles northeast from the chin, in the township of Morristown.  Its altitude is a little less than 4,000 feet, and were it not for the proximity of Mansfield, would doubtless be regarded as one of the favorite resorts for "sight-seeing", for the same enchanting glories are visible from this peak that meet the eye on Mansfield.  Between these two mountains a deep gorge intervenes, known as Smuggler's Notch, through which, in the early settlement, a bridle road was dept open, and tradition says contraband goods were secreted in and found their way through it; but latterly no one disturbs its solitude, except those seeking an exhibition of nature in her wildest and most romantic haunts."


Features numbered & lettered references to the following locations:

Congregational Church.
Methodist Church.
Baptist Church.
Universalist Church.
Town Hall.
Post Office.
People's Academy & Graded Schools.
Railroad Station.
Morrisville House, A. R. Terrill.
Vermont House.
News & Citizen, Lamoille Pub. Co..
Morrisville Foundry Co..
Pulp Mill.
J. W. Daniels, Butter Tub Mfrs..
A. J. Smith, Livery & Feed.
W. S. Cheney, Horses, Carriages and Sleighs.
Hendee & Fisk, Attorneys.
P. K. Gleed, Attorney.
E. J. Hall, M. D., Office and Residence.
J. A. Robinson, Dental Surgeon.
H. B. Bryant, Station and Express Agent, M'g. International Telegraph.
C. H. Slocum, Groceries, Clothing, Boots and Shoes.
Geo. K. Courier, Boston Cash Store.
G. W. Doty, Furniture, Carpets, Crockery, Paints and Oils.
A. M. Churchill, Tinware, Stoves and Hardware.
G. E. Woodward, M. D., Drugs and Medicines.
A. O. Gates, Drugs, Medicines, Books, etc..
Frank E. Healey, Jr., Watches, Jewelry and Silverware.
O. L. Woods, Merchant Tailor.
Andrews & Hitchcock, Meats and Provisions.
L. B. Boynton, Restaurant.
S. B. Doty, Produce and Fertilizers.
G. A. Barrows, Express and Truckman.
G. W. Hendee, Residence.
H. C. Fisk, Residence.
P. K. Gleed, Residence.
H. H. Powers, Residence.
C. M. Boynton, Residence.
A. M. Churchill, Residence.
Mt. Mansfield.
Mt. Sterling.
Elmore Mountains.

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