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Historic Railroad Map of Maryland & Delaware - 1876

Code:
1W-NE-RR2-1876-S-P
Shipping Weight:
2.00 pounds
Starting at $29.95

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New Railroad Map of the state of Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia.

Wilmington, established in the 1600's at the confluence of the Christina and Delaware Rivers, was a manufacturing giant during and after the American Civil War. The war effort brought many new manufacturers to the region and with the transportation of the two rivers they were able to ship goods easily.

Gunpowder was manufactured aggressively at a facility started by E. I. du Pont on the banks of nearby Brandywine River. Iron ships were produced in the port shipyards, and soldiers’ boots and leather goods of all sorts were manufactured in and around Wilmington.

In 1876 railroad cars were built and outfitted in Wilmington on a large scale.

In the early 1870's, the growing District of Columbia had been noted as being behind the times in its civic improvements. It still had dirt streets in most locations and no sewer system. President Grant issued the Organic Act of 1871, repealing the individual charters of Georgetown and Washington and creating the District of Columbia. In 1876, municipal improvements were being carried out on a large scale to modernize the city.

The modern improvements continued at Washington DC as streets were paved and a sewer system built. Electric lighting was installed in 1879.

In Baltimore, tempers were rising in 1876, as officials of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad proposed to lower its workers' wages, in an attempt to offset its deflation during the economic Panic of 1873. This would all culminate in Baltimore during the Great Railroad Strike of 1877.

This map compiled and drawn by Frank Arnold Gray in 1876 features waterways, canals, cities, towns, counties and roads. Included at the lower left is a list of railroads of the era and their particulars. The map displays portions of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey and the District of Columbia.